A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Lord, love a duck

see Love a duck


Lorry

British for truck dates from the early 19th century and originally was the name given to a kind of rolling stock consisting of a long flat wagon witho...

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Lose face

To lose face means to be humiliated or lose one’s reputation and originated amongst the British community in China during the late 19th century as a t...

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Lose one’s cherry

British slang for lose one’s virginity dates from the late 19th century mostly refers to girls but sometimes includes boys, derives from the supposed...

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Lose one’s lunch

American colloquialism for throw up or vomit dates from the 1940s.


Lose one’s marbles

This is an American expression from the late 19th century meaning to lose one’s sanity or wits. It derives from the allusion of a child losing his or...

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Lose one’s rag

To lose one’s rag is to lose one’s temper and seems to be a modern expression i.e. first of the 20th century. It is used on both sides of the Atlantic...

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Lose one’s shirt

In the sense of to suffer great financial loss dates from the 1930s, and derives from the earlier expression to bet one’s shirt on something, typicall...

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Lot on one’s plate

see On one’s plate


Lothario

A Lothario is an unfeeling man who seduces and uses women for his own gain and the word has been used in this this way since the mid-1700s. Lothario w...

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Lousy

Lousy is one of those words that evolved into slang since The Middle Ages when it meant infested with lice. Now of course it is only used figuratively...

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Love (in tennis)

The story that love in tennis comes from the English miss-pronunciation of the French l’oeuf for egg, which resembles a zero, is now disputed by most...

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Love a duck

This very mild British colloquialism expresses surprise or incredulity and dates from the early 19th century. For a more robust form see Fuck a duck a...

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Love at first sight

This was a familiar concept in ancient Greek and Roman literature in which the darts/arrows of Eros and Cupid played a catalytic role but it was not u...

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Love conquers all

An ancient saying dates back to Greek and Roman times and probably before. Virgil (70-19 BC) in Eclogues wrote, “Love conquers all” for which the orig...

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