A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater

see Throw the baby out with the bathwater


Donald Duck

Rhyming slang for fuck, Donald Duck/fuck, dates from the 1930s. In South Africa, to do a Donald means, to do a duck i.e. exit or depart quickly and da...

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Done and dusted

This phrase signifies successful completion of a task and appears to be a British expression from the mid-20th century. Its origin is obscure and is t...

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Donkey’s years

Curiously enough, this expression started life at the beginning of the 20th century as rhyming slang, donkey’s ears/years. By the 1920s, however, it h...

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Donnybrook

Irish for a drunken brawl and dates the mid-19th century derives from Donnybrook Fair held annually in Dublin County until 1855.


Doolally (tap)

Doolally is British slang from the old colonial days that is still heard from time to time but seldom used in print these days. It means touched, ecce...

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Doom and gloom

Doom and gloom is a rhyming couple that describes feelings of despondency or the forecast of bad tidings, especially in a financial or political conte...

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Door closes/shuts, another one opens

see When one door closes/shuts, another door opens


Doosra

A cricket term which dates from around 2004. A doosra is a ball bowled by a right-arm spinner that moves from leg to off instead of the normal off-bre...

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Dork

Originally, American slang for penis dates from the 1960s, perhaps a corruption of dick, but later took on the inoffensive meaning of a dull, stupid p...

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Dorothy

A Dorothy is Australian rhyming slang for a six-hit in cricket; Dorothy Dix/six. This usage dates from the late 20th century, although the term ‘Dorot...

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Dose of salts

Like a dose of salts means very quickly and derives from the speed at which Epsom salts work as a laxative. A British colloquialism that dates from th...

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Dose/taste of one’s own medicine

Means that the bad things done to other people are sometimes re-visited upon the original perpetrator. It is similar to the phrase to take one’s own...

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Dosh

British slang for money dates from c. 1944, according to Eric Partridge. The origin is unknown but because of its wartime appearance, Partridge ventur...

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Doss

To bed down or sleep in rough, common surroundings dates from the late 19th century and may derive from pugilism where to doss a person was to set the...

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