A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Kindred spirit/soul

A person who shares the same beliefs, attitudes etc with another, dates from the mid-19th century, but it is not known who coined the phrase.


Kiss arse/ass

see Kiss someone’s arse/ass


Kiss my arse/ass

This has been a vulgar, insulting invitation, but not a literal one, since the early 18th century when it would have been ‘kiss mine arse’. As an excl...

Read More


Kiss of death

This is something or someone that ultimately brings disaster or dysfunction to any endeavour. It is thought to derive from the most infamous kiss of d...

Read More


Kiss someone’s arse/ass

To kiss someone’s arse/ass or to kiss arse/ass is a vulgar, colloquial metaphor to behave in a flattering and obsequious manner, especially towards a...

Read More


Kiss the dust

see Bite the dust


Kisser

British slang for mouth since the 1860s.


Kissing gate

These gates are commonplace throughout the British countryside. The short swing of the gate and its design are such that pedestrians can pass through,...

Read More


Kit and caboodle

The full expression is the whole kit and caboodle, which means the whole lot and it is first attested from America during the mid-19th century. The eu...

Read More


Kitchen sink

see Everything but (or including) the kitchen sink


Kite/kiting

Kite as in a flying paper or fabric kite attached to a string and flown from the ground gets its name from the bird of prey of the same name and dates...

Read More


Kith and kin

Means friends and relations but the phrase is often used wrongly these days to refer to blood relatives only. Kith and kin are very old words of Norse...

Read More


Klutz

North American slang for a stupid, clumsy person dates from the early 1960s and derives from the Yiddish klots meaning a wooden beam, hence blockhead,...

Read More


Knacker’s yard

A place where horses were slaughtered, dates from the early 19th century and now refers to any place of dereliction. See also Knackered and Knackers.


Knackered

British colloquial expression for tired and exhausted since the 19th century and derives from knacker, which meant to slaughter a horse, hence knacker...

Read More


back to top