A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Get in a tizz/tizzy

see Tizz/tizzy


Get into shape

In the sense of fitness or training for sports etc dates from the mid-19th century. See also Shape and Lick into shape.


Get it in the neck

Means to get into trouble or serious difficulty, dates in this figurative sense from the late 19th century and is of American origin. All the evidence...

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Get knotted

British slang instructing someone to go away or go to hell dates from c. 1930. It took over from the earlier and now largely defunct get joined, which...

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Get lost

Originally an American English expression meaning to tell someone to go away, dates from the 1940s.


Get off on the right/wrong foot

To start a relationship either propitiously or adversely, American expressions that date from the early 20th century and which derive from the militar...

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Get off one’s high horse

see High horse


Get on like a house on fire

see Like a house on fire


Get on one’s bike

see On your bike


Get on someone’s wick

This expression dating from the 1930s is used innocently by all and sundry and means to annoy or irritate someone. What most people fail to realise is...

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Get one's leg over

See Legover


Get one’s act together

Get organised, originally an American expression deriving from show business dates from the 1950s.


Get one’s arse/ass in gear

Get moving; originally, an American expression dates from the 1960s based on the allusion of putting a motor car in gear and moving off.


Get one’s back up

To get irritated or annoyed, from the allusion to a cat arching its back in a confrontational attitude, dates from the late 19th century.


Get one’s dander up

To get one’s dander up means to get angry or annoyed. The expression is American from the early 19th century. Dander, which the OED says is an alterna...

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