A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Armed to the teeth

Forget all about sailors or pirates swinging aboard ships on ropes with knives or cutlasses in their teeth; this is not the origin, although Hollywood...

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Army marches on its stomach

The saying, an army marches on its stomach meaning that it cannot function without food (who can?), is attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte from the early...

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Around the block a few times

To have been around the block a few times, means that one is experienced in whatever particular context is being referred to, from the allusion of kno...

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Around the houses

The complete expression is to go (all) around the houses, a British expression from the mid-19th century and perhaps before, meaning to take a circuit...

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Arse

Arse was originally an ordinary, everyday word in Anglo-Saxon times for buttocks but which became obsolete in polite usage by the 18th century. In Ame...

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Arse about face

British slang expression for something that is back to front or all messed up, dates from the mid-20th century.


Arse about/around

British slang to fool about or behave in a silly or foolish manner, dates from the mid-20th century.


Arse bandit

British slang for homosexual, dates from the early 20th century.


Arse over elbow

British slang from the mid-20th century to fall head over heels or fall clumsily.


Arse-end of the universe or world

Absolutely nowhere or a very remote place that is not worth visiting, dates from the 1950s, thought to derive from RAF slang during WWII, from arse-en...

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Arse/ass kissing/licking

see Kiss someone’s arse/ass


Arse/ass over tit/tip

British and North American slang from the early 20th century to fall over spectacularly. James Joyce uses the expression in Ulysses (1922) as does Ste...

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Arsehole of the universe

see Arse-end of universe or world


Arsehole to breakfast time

British slang for all the time, all day and through the night, dates from the late 19th/early 20th century.


Arsehole/asshole

This word in its literal sense has been in use since the early 1400s. Its slang figurative use to describe a contemptible person is more modern and da...

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