A-Z Database

A-Z Database

All A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Come

Common euphemism for sexual climax dates from at least the mid-17th century. As a noun for semen, it dates from the early 20th century; often written...

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Come apart at the seams

This metaphor is used to describe both physical and emotional disintegration dates from the early 20th century and derives from a garment that is fall...

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Come clean

This American expression from the late 19th/early 20th century meaning to make full and transparent disclosure, obviously borrows from expressions lik...

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Come full circle

When events or issues come full circle, they come back to their original starting point, implying that little or no progress has been made. If the pro...

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Come hell or high water

At first glance, the expression come hell or high water meaning that no obstacle can stand in the way of completing a task or assignment, appears almo...

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Come home to roost

see Chickens coming home to roost


Come home with flying colours

To come home with flying colours alludes to the centuries-old Royal Navy practice of returning to home ports after being victorious in battle. They wo...

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Come in from the cold

This figurative expression meaning to return to the fold as in a place of warmth, safety and shelter gained currency during the 1960s with the publica...

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Come off the grass/come off it

Usually used in the form of an exclamation and means, don’t exaggerate or don’t tell lies and generally expresses incredulity. It dates in this sense...

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Come out of the closet

see Skeleton in the cupboard


Come quietly

This expression has nothing to do with discreet orgasms. It has rather been associated with police procedure since the late 19th/early 20th century bu...

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Come the old soldier (with someone)

Usually appears in the form of don’t come the old soldier with me and is a dismissive response to some attempted dodge or deceit perpetrated by the pa...

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Come the raw prawn (with someone)

Raw prawn is an Australian metaphor for an innocent or novice, particular a raw recruit in the armed forces, whence this expression is thought to deri...

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Come to the crunch

see Crunch


Come to the party

In the sense of join in, take part or become involved in something dates in this sense from the mid-20th century and is still one of the most often he...

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